• Authors on Editing

    Interview with an author – RJ Scott

    This week I interview USA Today bestselling MM romance author RJ Scott Who were your go-to authors when you were growing up? My Aunty Olive gave me a bag of books when I was maybe 12 or so, and there was a whole bunch of Mills & Boon – my actual first author I read in there was Janet Daley, who turned out to be somewhat of a plagiarist, but we didn’t know that for years. My go-to author for romance has to be Nora Roberts – she is the undisputed queen of the kind of romance I like to read! What was the first story you wrote? And, yes,…

  • Editing Tips

    Thoughts on editing.

    I’ve been an editor for over five years now and I wish I’d done it earlier. What I’ve learned: Editing should be a partnership between an author and editor. The editor may have the upper hand when it comes to wielding the Sword of Grammar/Spelling/etc., but it never does to be pedantic. If there’s one thing that does my nut, it’s when an editor ignores the voice. A high-school dropout who’s grown up on a ranch in the wilds of Montana isn’t going to speak in a grammatically correct manner nor are they going to think like that. So, when editing a manuscript which has been written in close third…

  • Editing Tips

    Five simple fixes for your manuscript

    When I do the first pass of a manuscript, I tend to highlight the things that pull me out of the narrative. When you’re getting your story ready for editing, or submitting to a publisher, these are the five things that might be worth looking for (in no particular order). Pet words/repetition. Don’t fret. Everybody has them. I would recommend doing a word search and some of the most oft-used words are: Look, Against, Only, Just, A little, Pull, Push, Slide, Sound, Soft, FeltShow –v- Tell. Show –v- Tell. Some will say that telling is an absolute no-no. But there are no absolutes when it comes to writing and rules…

  • Editing Tips

    Five questions for your editor

    There are so many editors out there and it can be a bit overwhelming when you’re searching for one. It’s important that you find the right one for you and your work. Here are some questions you might want to ask. 1. What are your fees? What do they include? Sometimes it seems as if there are as many different editing fee structures as there are editors. Some charge by the word, others by the hour. Sometimes the fees are levied per single pass of a manuscript and others include more than one pass. There are editors to suit all budgets. It’s just a matter of finding the editor you…